Artists & Scholars

Lynn Abbot

Lynn Abbot is the Hogan Jazz Archive’s Assistant Curator of Recorded Sound. He is best known for his publications on American Vernacular music, including the often cited trilogy that he coauthored with colleague Doug Seroff, Out of Sight, Ragged But Right, and The Original Blues.

Lynn Abbot

Laura Rosanne Adderley, Ph.D.

Laura Rosanne Adderley is Associate Professor of African Diaspora History at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana where she has worked almost continuously since 1996. She works primarily as a comparative slavery historian focusing particularly on the 19th century, and the era of slave trade abolition and emancipation. Although the bulk of her research has concerned British slave trade suppression and the Africans affected by it, because of the nature of the 19th-century Atlantic slave trade, her research work has various transnational components across multiple colonial and geographic boundaries, including most significantly interaction between the British and Spanish colonized Caribbean and North America. Adderley is author of “New Negroes from Africa” : Slave Trade Abolition and Free African Settlement in the Nineteenth-Century Caribbean (2006).  The book was a co-winner of the Wesley-Logan Prize for African Diaspora History, a prize jointly awarded by the American Historical Association (AHA) and the Association for the Study of African-American Life and History (ASALH).  Adderley is currently working on several book projects including a micro-history of involving sexual assault aboard a 19th-century slave ship and a study of the earliest “liberated Africans” settled in Antigua, the Bahamas and Tortola during the 1820s.  Since 2013 she has served as the administrative director for the Africana Studies Program at Tulane. She also serves as as one of two Tulane representatives on the Board of the Amistad Research Center; and is currently a board member and secretary for the academic Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD).  She is also a part of a New Orleans based effort to research and create public education around the life and legacy of African-American Episcopal saint, Frances Joseph Gaudet–an early 20th-century and educator and prison reform advocate.  Adderley is also broadly interested in public history projects related to black enslavement and its legacies around the Americas; with a focus on how high quality public history projects can influence visionary public policies and strong community culture in the present.

Laura Rosanne Adderley, Ph.D. Shannon Blady, Ph.D.

Rachel Sian Breunlin

Rachel Breunlin, Masters in Urban Studies, is the co-director of the Neighborhood Story Project and a member of the faculty in the Department of Anthropology at the University of New Orleans where she teaches courses in storytelling and public culture. Since 2004, she has edited or co-written 15 NSP books, and published articles in journals such as American AnthropologistPracticing Anthropology, and African Arts that explore the art and politics of collaborative methodologies. For ten years, she ran a book-making program at John McDonogh Senior High, and has worked extensively with community-based organizations such as social aid and pleasure clubs, Mardi Gras Indians, and grassroots museums. Co-author of Talk That Music Talk: Passing On Brass Band Music in New Orleans, she has recently co-written a teacher’s guide, Music, Culture, and Social Change in New Orleans with the New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park. 

Rachel Sian Breunlin Nikki Lynne Marie Brown, Ph.D. Courtney Bryan, D.M.A. Freddi Williams Evans

Brooke Grant, Ph.D.

Brooke Grant, PhD was born and raised in Buffalo, New York where she taught middle school social studies for ten years. Today she is a professor of practice in the Teacher Preparation and Certification Program here at Tulane University. In addition to teaching, Dr. Grant runs SS NOLA, a program dedicated to supporting social studies teachers in the New Orleans area.

Brooke Grant, Ph.D.

Luther Gray

Luther Gray has been active in the New Orleans arts community since 1984. He co-founded the Congo Square Foundation in 1989, which was renamed the Congo Square Preservation Society in 2011. The Society has been instrumental in the resurrection of drumming and cultural activities in Congo Square. In 1993, the Congo Square Foundation was successful in placing Congo Square on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1997 the Foundation led the effort to erect the Congo Square historic marker. In addition, he with a team of drum makers including Douglas Redd carved three Bamboula drums from a one-hundred-year old cypress tree that are now on display at the new Louisiana State Museum of History in Baton Rouge. The Congo Square Preservation Society sponsors weekly Sunday drum circles in Congo Square that date back to 1988. In 2013, the Congo Square Preservation society launched the Congo Square Living Classroom Fieldtrip which consists of an on-site tour of the Armstrong Park Sculpture Garden followed by the Congo Square Drum & Dance Workshop. Luther founded two major musical groups, Percussion Incorporated in 1985 and Bamboula 2000 in 1994. He has produced 7 compact discs for these two groups; “Windswept”, “Congo Square”, “Cultural Warrior”, “New Society”, “Live at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival”, We Got It Goin’ One” and “The Wild Bamboulas”. Luther Gray and Bamboula 2000 annually teach approximately 5,000 students in elementary, middle, high schools and universities around the country with The Imagination Tour.

Luther Gray

Fred Johnson

Fred Johnson is the co-founder of Black Men of Labor Social Aid and Pleasure Club. Started in 1994 with musicians Gregg Stafford and Benny Jones, Senior, the club’s mission is to keep traditional brass band music alive on the streets of New Orleans. Inspired by the legacy of jazz musician and historian Danny Barker, and the Big Chief of the Yellow Pocahontas Mardi Gras Indian tribe, Allison “Tootie” Montana, the club is known for their use of African fabrics, intricate beadwork, and commitment to social justice and the legacy of civil rights in New Orleans. Committed to connecting this history to the larger story of music in New Orleans, Fred has been a part of Spike Lee’s When the Levees Failed, Matt Sakakeeny’s Roll With It, and was a partner in Talk That Music Talk. He is the executive director of the Neighborhood Development Foundation in Central City.

Fred Johnson

Greg Lambousy

Greg Lambousy is the Director of the New Orleans Jazz Museum. In his twenty+ years with the Louisiana State Museum, Lambousy has managed the institution’s collections of more than 450,000 artifacts and other historical items, supervised the Colonial Documents Digitization Project (covering more than 70,000 French and Spanish records), conducted oral histories and guided the selection and accession of materials related to Hurricane Katrina, expanded the LSM’s music holdings by collecting a wide variety of artifacts related to jazz and other genres, and developed the operational plan for the Mint Performing Arts Center. Greg built the museum’s archives of contemporary photographs documenting traditional Louisiana culture and events of historical significance, helped establish the annual Mighty Mississippi Down River Festival. Most recently, he has been overseeing development of the New Orleans Jazz Museum, which is slated for a complete renovation at the Old U.S. Mint beginning in 2018.

Greg Lambousy

Leon Miller

Leon Miller is the Head of the Louisiana Research Collection (LaRC). He supervised manuscripts processing at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, before becoming head of Tulane University’s Manuscripts Department in 1991. He was named head of the Louisiana Research Collection in 2009. Miller is a past president of the Academy of Certified Archivists (ACA) and the Society of Southwest Archivists (SSA). He has served on the boards of the Louisiana Archives and Manuscripts Association, Society of Southwest Archivists, Society of American Archivists, and the Academy of Certified Archivists. Both the Academy of Certified Archivists and the Society of Southwest Archivists have honored Miller with Distinguished Service Awards. In 2010, he was named a Fellow of the Society of American Archivists.

Leon Miller

Wendi Moore-O'Neal

Wendi Moore O’Neal is a cultural worker, facilitator, and educator, born and raised in New Orleans. Wendi has worked in local, regional and national organizations; but her heart’s work is rooted in the kind of organizing that happens around kitchen tables in the Black-belt South. Rooted in practices learned from civil rights movement veterans, Wendi uses freedom singing to apply movement values and lessons from the past to change conditions in the contemporary moment. Wendi gets groups together to listen and tell stories of life experiences to encourage people to organize across a broad range of issues and identities – and to practice being fearless enough to build working class people’s power to live whole, creative lives now and into the future.

Wendi Moore-O'Neal Musicians of Preservation Hall Nicholas Payton

Jamilah Peters-Muhammad

Jamilah Yejide Peters-Muhammad is affectionately known in her community as Mama Jamilah. She is a proud Mother of 3 Sons, Grandmother of 6, and a Great Grandmother of 8. Jamilah is co-founder of the Congo Square Preservation Society and presently serves as the Vice Chair of the Board of Directors. “Preserving the Past to Strengthen the Future” is a mantra that guides this phase of her life and as a community elder believes all she has learned in life is only hers to pass on to the next generation. Legacy is equal to eternal life. Jamilah is a gifted healer and works in the community to promote the importance of safe health and wellness practices. She is a registered nurse with advance practice in Faith Community Nursing. She sits on several boards on both the local and national levels. Jamilah is also a dancer, percussionist, singer, Mardi Indian Queen, and story-teller. She currently works with the Ashé Cultural Arts Center and the New Orleans Musicians Assistance Foundation is the capacity of a Health and Wellness/Outreach Consultant.

Jamilah Peters-Muhammad Matt Sakakeeny, Ph.D.

Ashley Shabankareh

Ashley Shabankareh, Director of Programs for the Preservation Hall Foundation, is involved in a variety of efforts that bring the joy of music to New Orleans. At Preservation Hall she coordinates free private music lessons for kids in need, residencies for students who don’t have music programs at their schools, financial resources for aging musicians and more. Founded in 2011, the foundation’s mission is to “to protect, preserve, and perpetuate the musical traditions and heritage of New Orleans” through music education, academic research, historical archiving and promotional outreach campaigns. In addition to her work at Preservation Hall, Ashley is a professional musician (trombone, baritone, vocalist) who has performed with Allen Toussaint and Aretha Franklin, and is currently with local groups The Asylum Chorus and Marina Orchestra. She’s also fundraising chair of the Camel Toe Lady Steppers, an all-female Mardi Gras dance troupe, which supports the music education and mentoring program Roots of Music. In addition, she is a member of the Loyola University Young Alumni, and serves on the boards of the Jazz Education Network (JEN) and the Music & Culture of New Orleans (MaCCNO).

Ashley Shabankareh

Dorotha Smith-Simmons

Doratha Smith Simmons was the secretary of the New Orleans chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality, where she participated in the Freedom Rides to Mississippi as well as many boycotts and sit-ins around New Orleans. For many years she worked with traditional jazz musicians at Preservation Hall, and has a life long commitment to how music is connected to the struggles for equality. A producer with the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, she continues to speak out about the importance of sustaining the legacy of New Orleans music. Currently working on a book about the history of New Orleans CORE and maintains and important Civil Rights and music archive. In 2014, she was a partner with Talk That Music Talk.

Dorotha Smith-Simmons

Jerome Smith

Jerome Smith is the co-founder of the New Orleans chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality, and life-long freedom fighter. A participant in many freedom rides and freedom Summers during the Civil Rights Movement, he returned to New Orleans to co-found an important youth-based social justice organization called Tambourine and Fan, which used cultural institutions such as brass bands, second line parades and Mardi Gras Indians to instill social messages of empowerment for young people. Thousands of youth in New Orleans have come of age in Tambourine and Fan, and have gone on to start many important cultural institutions. After many years of running the Tremé Community Center, Jerome has retired but continues to work as an advocate for young people and racial justice in the city.

Jerome Smith
Workshop Co-Directors

Bruce Sunpie Barnes

Bruce Sunpie Barnes is a musician, photographer, ethnographer, and music educator with over 30 years of experience creating programs that connect communities with their local cultures. In 2006, as a National Park Service Interpretive Ranger at New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, Sunpie created the “Music For All Ages” mentorship program, which brought together professional musicians with K-12 students to teach traditional New Orleans brass band and jazz music. In 2012, he began working on an in-depth collaborative ethnography of musical mentorship and the Civil Rights Movement, which led to the publication of Talk That Music Talk, Passing All Brass Band Music The Traditional Way (The Center for the Book at the University of New Orleans). His writings and photography have been also been published in Smithsonian Folkways, Green Horizons, African Arts, The Washington Post, and South Writ Large.

As park ranger, Sunpie received the 2014 “Keeper of the Light” award for interpretive excellence. He has produced six CDs of original music with his group Sunpie Louisiana Sunspots that focus Afro-Louisiana Créole, as well as six CDs with the National Park Service. In 2014/2015 Sunpie joined the “Paul Simon and Sting Together” musical group, which embarked on 60-city world tour to 37 countries. Sunpie is the Big Chief of the North Side Skull and Bone, one of the oldest Afro- Créole/African American carnival traditions New Orleans. For past 14 years, he has been a member of the Black Men Of Labor Social Aid and Pleasure Club.

Bruce Sunpie Barnes

Sonya Robinson

Sonya Robinson has over 20 years’ experience in the field of arts integrated learning, creating programs for educational, nonprofit, and corporate audiences. Her extensive experience designing and implementing summer institutes for teachers includes facilitating programs for Lincoln Center Institute, Mississippi Arts Commission, Tennessee Performing Arts Center, Louisiana ICI, and Fordham University. Sonya empowers educators with practical tools and authentic models of integrating the arts and humanities to build relevant, transferable skills across academic content. She has implemented professional development series, served as a curriculum coach, and designed teaching artist residencies in over 50 schools, colleges and universities, for organizations including National A+ Schools Consortium, Symphony Space, Ballet Hispanico, and KID smART. Sonya currently serves as the Director of Artist Corps New Orleans and as the Director of Educator Engagement for Music Rising at Tulane University.

Sonya Robinson
Staff

Rebecca Snedeker

Rebecca Snedeker is the Clark Executive Director of the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South at Tulane University. Previously, as an independent documentary filmmaker, writer, and program curator, she cultivated a body of work that supports human rights, creative expression, and care for place in her native city, New Orleans. Snedeker co-authored Unfathomable City: A New Orleans Atlas (University of California Press, 2013), a book of 22 imaginative maps and essays, with Rebecca Solnit. She has produced several documentaries that take place in the Gulf South, including Preservation Hall (commission, 2000), By Invitation Only (PBS, 2007), Witness: Katrina (National Geographic Channel, 2010), and Land of Opportunity (ARTE, 2010) and contributed to many others, including Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans (PBS, 2007) and A Village Called Versailles (PBS, 2008). Snedeker served on the Steering Committee of New Day Films, a filmmaker-owned educational distribution company and the boards of the New Orleans Film Society and Patois: The New Orleans International Human Rights Film Festival. She is the recipient of an Emmy Award and director of projects funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Rebecca Snedeker

Denise Frazier, Ph.D.

Dr. Denise Frazier is Assistant Director for the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South. An interest in Cuban politics and African Diaspora culture within Latin America led her to New Orleans where she received an MA and PhD in Latin American Studies at Tulane University.  She has taught Spanish, Latin American Studies, and African Diaspora-related courses on the university level at Tulane University, Xavier University, and Southern University of New Orleans.  Frazier has also taught violin with Make Music NOLA. She has lectured and presented seminars and workshops on diversity, African Diaspora culture, contemporary music and performance all around the country.

Denise Frazier, Ph.D.

Regina Cairns

Regina Cairns is Executive Secretary of the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South.

Regina Cairns

Renard Bridgewater

Renard Bridgewater is a native New Orleanian and graduate of both Holy Cross High School and the University of New Orleans. As a tenured veteran in the city’s Hip-Hop community (performing under the moniker Slangston Hughes) and previous participant in Sweet Home New Orleans’ Accessing Artist Revenue Streams course, he has a passion for live music, event management and artist empowerment, and continues to pass on the knowledge he has gained to help empower his peers. This is utilized in his Uniquity (yoo-knik-wi-tee) Music imprint, which provides a performance platform for touring bands and local Hip-Hop, R&B and Spoken Word artists, as well as providing music publishing for local artists and facilitating workshops that cultivate professional development in the music industry. Renard serves as the Community Engagement Coordinator for MaCCNO (the Music and Culture Coalition of New Orleans), where he continues to disseminate information, build partnerships and organize New Orleans based musicians, street performers and culture bearers on issues surrounding social justice, culture and policy that directly affects those individuals. He joined that team after nearly fourteen years in Human Resources and Production with The Times-Picayune.

Renard Bridgewater

Hannah Kreiger-Benson

Hannah Krieger Benson is the meeting facilitator and programming coordinator for the Music and Culture Coalition of New Orleans (MaCCNO). Her proposed MA thesis about how law/power systems shape the distribution of music venues throughout New Orleans led her into this work. Hannah makes her living playing piano/singing in the historic Pat O’Brien’s piano bar, and is a member of several bands including The Asylum Chorus, Marina Orchestra, and the Hannah KB Band. She was a 2015 City Business Woman of the Year.

Hannah Kreiger-Benson